Global Cord Blood Industry Database 2015-16 – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The Global Cord Blood Industry Database 2015-16 Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

As the global leader in cord blood industry data, one of the questions that the authors often get asked is, “How many cord blood companies are active in the world, right now?” If you operate a cord blood bank, you may have asked yourself that question.

Now you can know this answer, because this database has a complete list of known cord blood banks that are operating worldwide as of 2015.

As of today, there are close to 500 cord blood banks worldwide.

This global cord blood industry database contains nearly 6,000 industry contacts to assist you with doing a detailed market analysis for the global cord blood banking industry.

A Maturing Industry

Over the past few years, the authors witnessed a maturation of the cord blood banking market, and that means more competition for you.

When the authors first started tracking the cord blood industry in 2006, there were 23 active cord blood banks worldwide. Now there are nearly 500 active cord blood banks, spread out across 98 different countries across the world. When you consider the competitive expansion that is occurring within this industry, you understand why it is crucial to have a current understanding of the competitors functioning in this space and their geographical coverage.

Claim this global industry database to learn the specific people and companies operating within the global cord blood banking industry.

How it Came About

The “Global Cord Blood Industry Database” was initially developed as an in-house list. We began keeping a database for the cord blood industry when the authors began tracking the industry in 2006. In that year the authors began producing market intelligence reports for the cord blood banking industry and offering expert marketing advice and consultation to cord blood banks.

As a result of years of committed research into the cord blood banking industry, and hundreds of hours spent with clients, the authors now offer the landmark report, the “Complete 2015-16 Global Cord Blood Industry Report.”

Because the authors are specialists in the cord blood banking industry and have collected nearly a decade of industry data, the authors put our industry knowledge into a targeted, actionable report for you – a report that provides public and private cord blood banks, as well as industry investors, with a current understanding of the global cord blood banking marketplace as it is in 2015.

Similarly, the authors developed this database as an in-house research tool over the course of the past decade, to assist us with producing the best cord blood industry data available anywhere.

Becoming What it is Today

At the time the authors began tracking the cord blood banking industry, there were only a small number of cord blood banks worldwide and it was unknown what the industry would – or would not – grow into. Now in 2015 , there are nearly 500 active cord blood banks worldwide, and this database has grown to include them all.

It is a comprehensive industry database containing contacts for individuals operating every known cord blood company worldwide (approximately 3,500), as well as approximately related 2,500 cord blood industry contacts, for a total of nearly 6,000 contacts.

We spent years creating this database so that the authors would stay fully informed of changes within the industry and have the capability to analyze trends, recognize growth rates, and identify regional variations within the cord blood banking industry.

As the leading supplier of industry data for cord blood banks, this database developed as an in-house list, but the authors responded when our existing clients requested that the authors share it with them too.

Empower Yourself with Knowledge

While you may have know that the cord blood banking industry has matured over the past few years, it is unlikely that you have tracked the exact number of your competitors.

However, a lack of awareness could be harming your business.

Claim this global cord blood industry database to become aware of the companies and organizations operating in your industry. Use it to recognize your dangerous competitive threats, as well as to identify weak competitors that could represent an opportunity to take market share.

The Most Comprehensive Industry Database Available

To our knowledge, the “Global Cord Blood Industry Database 2015-16” is the most complete cord blood industry database available anywhere.

While you may find another supplier of contacts for the cord blood industry, the authors are not aware of any other company who offers a complete global database for the entire cord blood banking industry.

No one else is providing this information, because they don’t know it themselves.

If they cannot even empower you with this essential industry knowledge, then how can they provide you with contacts for the management teams operating each cord blood bank worldwide? How can they provide you with other cord blood industry contacts worldwide? They can’t.

Here is What You Can Expect:

1) Competitive Intelligence
Be fully informed about the companies operating in your industry, whether they have been in business for several decades or have just begun operations.

2) Strategic Positioning
Be fully equipped with all information necessary to successfully lead your company.

3) Recognize Dangerous Competitive Threats
Be aware of companies that are rapidly expanding or new market entrants that represent a threat to your business.

4) Industry Security
Be able to operate in the cord blood banking industry while fully informed, even as the industry matures and grows more competitive.

5) Out-Compete the Competition
Have an edge on your competition by acquiring knowledge and insight that they don’t have.
You’ll Also Learn…

When you claim this file, you’ll learn the “Top Countries for Cord Blood Banking Worldwide,” as ranked by the number of cord blood bank facilities active within the country. Currently, the top 15 countries are:

1. USA
2. Italy
3. Spain
4. Germany
5. United Kingdom
6. India
7. Canada
8. Israel
9. Brazil
10. Australia
11. Belgium
12. Poland
13. Chile
14. Cyprus
15. China

Applications for Your Business

As a private cord blood bank, you can use the “Global Cord Blood Industry Database 2015-16” to acquire industry knowledge, including identifying companies and organizations operating in your industry, recognizing your most dangerous competitive threats, or identifying weak competitors from whom you can take market share.

You can also use the database to determine the degree to which your company is impacted by public cord blood banks, through observing their prevalence in your region and worldwide.

You can use it for business development purposes, to identify opportunities for collaboration and profit.

Read more and order at Global Cord Blood Industry Database 2015-16

The 2018-2023 World Outlook for Stem Cell Technological Applications – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The The 2018-2023 World Outlook for Stem Cell Technological Applications Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

This study covers the world outlook for stem cell technological applications across more than 190 countries. For each year reported, estimates are given for the latent demand, or potential industry earnings (P.I.E.), for the country in question (in millions of U.S. dollars), the percent share the country is of the region, and of the globe. These comparative benchmarks allow the reader to quickly gauge a country vis-à-vis others. Using econometric models which project fundamental economic dynamics within each country and across countries, latent demand estimates are created. This report does not discuss the specific players in the market serving the latent demand, nor specific details at the product level. The study also does not consider short-term cyclicalities that might affect realized sales. The study, therefore, is strategic in nature, taking an aggregate and long-run view, irrespective of the players or products involved. This study does not report actual sales data (which are simply unavailable, in a comparable or consistent manner in virtually all of the countries of the world). This study gives, however, my estimates for the worldwide latent demand, or the P.I.E., for stem cell technological applications. It also shows how the P.I.E. is divided across the world's regional and national markets. For each country, I also show my estimates of how the P.I.E. grows over time (positive or negative growth). In order to make these estimates, a multi-stage methodology was employed that is often taught in courses on international strategic planning at graduate schools of business.

1.3 The Methodology

In order to estimate the latent demand for stem cell technological applications on a worldwide basis, I used a multi-stage approach. Before applying the approach, one needs a basic theory from which such estimates are created. In this case, I heavily rely on the use of certain basic economic assumptions. In particular, there is an assumption governing the shape and type of aggregate latent demand functions. Latent demand functions relate the income of a country, city, state, household, or individual to realized consumption. Latent demand (often realized as consumption when an industry is efficient), at any level of the value chain, takes place if an equilibrium is realized. For firms to serve a market, they must perceive a latent demand and be able to serve that demand at a minimal return. The single most important variable determining consumption, assuming latent demand exists, is income (or other financial resources at higher levels of the value chain). Other factors that can pivot or shape demand curves include external or exogenous shocks (i.e., business cycles), and or changes in utility for the product in question.

Ignoring, for the moment, exogenous shocks and variations in utility across countries, the aggregate relation between income and consumption has been a central theme in economics. The figure below concisely summarizes one aspect of problem. In the 1930s, John Meynard Keynes conjectured that as incomes rise, the average propensity to consume would fall. The average propensity to consume is the level of consumption divided by the level of income, or the slope of the line from the origin to the consumption function. He estimated this relationship empirically and found it to be true in the short-run (mostly based on cross-sectional data). The higher the income, the lower the average propensity to consume. This type of consumption function is shown as "B" in the figure below (note the rather flat slope of the curve). In the 1940s, another macroeconomist, Simon Kuznets, estimated long-run consumption functions which indicated that the marginal propensity to consume was rather constant (using time series data across countries). This type of consumption function is show as "B" in the figure below (note the higher slope and zero-zero intercept).

The average propensity to consume is constant. For a general overview of this subject area, see Principles of Macroeconomics by N. Gregory Mankiw, South-Western College Publishing; ISBN: 0030340594; 2nd edition (February 2002).

Is it declining or is it constant? A number of other economists, notably Franco Modigliani and Milton Friedman, in the 1950s (and Irving Fisher earlier), explained why the two functions were different using various assumptions on intertemporal budget constraints, savings, and wealth. The shorter the time horizon, the more consumption can depend on wealth (earned in previous years) and business cycles. In the long-run, however, the propensity to consume is more constant. Similarly, in the long-run, households, industries, or countries with no income eventually have no consumption (wealth is depleted). While the debate surrounding beliefs about how income and consumption are related and interesting, in this study a very particular school of thought is adopted. In particular, we are considering the latent demand for stem cell technological applications across some 190 countries. The smallest have fewer than 10,000 inhabitants. I assume that all of these counties fall along a "long-run" aggregate consumption function. This long-run function applies despite some of these countries having wealth; current income dominates the latent demand for stem cell technological applications. So, latent demand in the long-run has a zero intercept. However, I allow firms to have different propensities to consume (including being on consumption functions with differing slopes, which can account for differences in industrial organization, and end-user preferences).

Given this overriding philosophy, I will now describe the methodology used to create the latent demand estimates for stem cell technological applications. Since this methodology applies to a large number of categories, the rather academic discussion below is general and can be applied to a wide variety of categories, not just stem cell technological applications.

1.3.1 Step 1. Product Definition And Data Collection

Any study of latent demand across countries requires that some standard be established to define "efficiently served". Having implemented various alternatives and matched these with market outcomes, I have found that the optimal approach is to assume that certain key countries are more likely to be at or near efficiency than others. These countries are given greater weight than others in the estimation of latent demand compared to other countries for which no known data are available. Of the many alternatives, I have found the assumption that the world’s highest aggregate income and highest income-per-capita markets reflect the best standards for “efficiency”. High aggregate income alone is not sufficient (i.e., China has high aggregate income, but low income per capita and cannot be assumed to be efficient). Aggregate income can be operationalized in a number of ways, including gross domestic product (for industrial categories), or total disposable income (for household categories; population times average income per capita, or number of households times average household income per capita). Brunei, Nauru, Kuwait, and Lichtenstein are examples of countries with high income per capita, but not assumed to be efficient, given low aggregate level of income (or gross domestic product); these countries have, however, high incomes per capita but may not benefit from the efficiencies derived from economies of scale associated with large economies. Only countries with high income per capita and large aggregate income are assumed efficient. This greatly restricts the pool of countries to those in the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), like the United States, or the United Kingdom (which were earlier than other large OECD economies to liberalize their markets).

The selection of countries is further reduced by the fact that not all countries in the OECD report have industry revenues at the category level. Countries that typically have ample data at the aggregate level that meet the efficiency criteria include the United States, the United Kingdom, and in some cases France and Germany.
Is it declining or is it constant? A number of other economists, notably Franco Modigliani and Milton Friedman, in the 1950s (and Irving Fisher earlier), explained why the two functions were different using various assumptions on intertemporal budget constraints, savings, and wealth. The shorter the time horizon, the more consumption can depend on wealth (earned in previous years) and business cycles. In the long-run, however, the propensity to consume is more constant. Similarly, in the long-run, households, industries, or countries with no income eventually have no consumption (wealth is depleted). While the debate surrounding beliefs about how income and consumption are related and interesting, in this study a very particular school of thought is adopted. In particular, we are considering the latent demand for stem cell technological applications across some 190 countries. The smallest have fewer than 10,000 inhabitants. I assume that all of these counties fall along a "long-run" aggregate consumption function. This long-run function applies despite some of these countries having wealth; current income dominates the latent demand for stem cell technological applications. So, latent demand in the long-run has a zero intercept. However, I allow firms to have different propensities to consume (including being on consumption functions with differing slopes, which can account for differences in industrial organization, and end-user preferences).Given this overriding philosophy, I will now describe the methodology used to create the latent demand estimates for stem cell technological applications. Since this methodology applies to a large number of categories, the rather academic discussion below is general and can be applied to a wide variety of categories, not just stem cell technological applications.

1.3.1 Step 1. Product Definition And Data Collection

Any study of latent demand across countries requires that some standard be established to define "efficiently served". Having implemented various alternatives and matched these with market outcomes, I have found that the optimal approach is to assume that certain key countries are more likely to be at or near efficiency than others. These countries are given greater weight than others in the estimation of latent demand compared to other countries for which no known data are available. Of the many alternatives, I have found the assumption that the world’s highest aggregate income and highest income-per-capita markets reflect the best standards for “efficiency”. High aggregate income alone is not sufficient (i.e., China has high aggregate income, but low income per capita and cannot be assumed to be efficient). Aggregate income can be operationalized in a number of ways, including gross domestic product (for industrial categories), or total disposable income (for household categories; population times average income per capita, or number of households times average household income per capita). Brunei, Nauru, Kuwait, and Lichtenstein are examples of countries with high income per capita, but not assumed to be efficient, given low aggregate level of income (or gross domestic product); these countries have, however, high incomes per capita but may not benefit from the efficiencies derived from economies of scale associated with large economies. Only countries with high income per capita and large aggregate income are assumed efficient. This greatly restricts the pool of countries to those in the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), like the United States, or the United Kingdom (which were earlier than other large OECD economies to liberalize their markets).The selection of countries is further reduced by the fact that not all countries in the OECD report have industry revenues at the category level. Countries that typically have ample data at the aggregate level that meet the efficiency criteria include the United States, the United Kingdom, and in some cases France and Germany.Latent demand is therefore estimated using data collected for relatively efficient markets from independent data sources (e.g. Euromonitor, Mintel, Thomson Financial Services, the U.S. Industrial Outlook, the World Resources Institute, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, various agencies from the United Nations, industry trade associations, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank). Depending on original data sources used, the definition of "stem cell technological applications" is established. In the case of this report, the data were reported at the aggregate level, with no further breakdown or definition. In other words, any potential products that might be incorporated within stem cell technological applications fall under this category. Public sources rarely report data at the disaggregated level in order to protect private information from individual firms that might dominate a specific product-market. These sources will therefore aggregate across components of a category and report only the aggregate to the public. While private data are certainly available, this report only relies on public data at the aggregate level without reliance on the summation of various category components. In other words, this report does not aggregate a number of components to arrive at the "whole". Rather, it starts with the "whole", and estimates the whole for all countries and the world at large (without needing to know the specific parts that went into the whole in the first place).Given this caveat, in this report we define the sales of stem cell technological applications as including all commonly understood products falling within this broad category, such as cancer treatments, cardiovascular therapies, central nervous system (CNS) uses, and non-therapeutic applications, irrespective of product packaging, formulation, size, or form. Companies participating in this industry include Mesoblast, Pharmicell, Reliance Life Sciences, NuVasive, Orthofix, and MEDIPOST. In addition to the sources indicated below, additional information available to the public via news and/or press releases published by players in the industry was considered in defining and calibrating this category. All figures are in a common currency (U.S. dollars, millions) and are not adjusted for inflation (i.e., they are current values). Exchange rates used to convert to U.S. dollars are averages for the year in question. Future exchange rates are assumed to be constant in the future at the current level (the average of the year of this publication’s release in 2017).This report was prepared from a variety of sources including excerpts from documents and official reports or databases published by the World Bank, the U.S. Department of Commerce, the U.S. State Department, various national agencies, the International Monetary Fund, the Central Intelligence Agency, various agencies from the United Nations (e.g. ILO, ITU, UNDP, etc.), and non-governmental sources and various public sources cited in the trade press.

1.3.2 Step 2. Filtering And Smoothing

Based on the aggregate view of stem cell technological applications as defined above, data were then collected for as many similar countries as possible for that same definition, at the same level of the value chain. This generates a convenience sample of countries from which comparable figures are available. If the series in question do not reflect the same accounting period, then adjustments are made. In order to eliminate short-term effects of business cycles, the series are smoothed using a 2-year moving average weighting scheme (longer weighting schemes do not substantially change the results). If data are available for a country, but these reflect short-run aberrations due to exogenous shocks (such as would be the case of beef sales in a country stricken with foot and mouth disease), these observations were dropped or "filtered" from the analysis.

1.3.3 Step 3. Filling In Missing Values

In some cases, data are available for countries on a sporadic basis. In other cases, data from a country may be available for only one year. From a Bayesian perspective, these observations should be given the greatest weight in estimating missing years. Assuming that other factors are held constant, the missing years are extrapolated using changes and growth in aggregate national income. Based on the overriding philosophy of a long-run consumption function (defined earlier), countries which have missing data for any given year are estimated based on historical dynamics of aggregate income for that country.

1.3.4 Step 4. Varying Parameter, Non-Linear Estimation

Given the data available from the first three steps, the latent demand in additional countries is estimated using a "varying-parameter cross-sectionally pooled time series model".

The interested reader can find longer discussions of this type of modeling in Studies in Global Econometrics (Advanced Studies in Theoretical and Applied Econometrics V. 30), by Henri Theil, et al., Kluwer Academic Publishers; ISBN: 0792336607; (June 1996), and in Principles of Econometrics, by Henri Theil John Wiley & Sons; ISBN: 0471858455; (December 1971), and in Econometric Models and Economic Forecasts by Robert S. Pindyck, Daniel L. Rubinfeld McGraw Hill Text; ISBN: 0070500983; 3rd edition (December 1991). Simply stated, the effect of income on latent demand is assumed to be constant across countries unless there is empirical evidence to suggest that this effect varies (i.e., the slope of the income effect is not necessarily the same for all countries). This assumption applies across countries along the aggregate consumption function, but also over time (i.e., not all countries are perceived to have the same income growth prospects over time and this effect can vary from country to country as well). Another way of looking at this is to say that latent demand for stem cell technological applications is more likely to be similar across countries that have similar characteristics in terms of economic development (i.e., African countries will have similar latent demand structures controlling for the income variation across the pool of African countries). This approach is useful across countries for which some notion of non-linearity exists in the aggregate cross-country consumption function. For some categories, however, the reader must realize that the numbers will reflect a country’s contribution to global latent demand and may never be realized in the form of local sales. For certain country-category combinations this will result in what at first glance will be odd results. For example, the latent demand for the category "space vehicles" will exist for Togo even though they have no space program. The assumption is that if the economies in these countries did not exist, the world aggregate for these categories would be lower. The share attributed to these countries is based on a proportion of their income (however small) being used to consume the category in question (i.e., perhaps via resellers).

1.3.5 Step 5. Fixed-Parameter Linear Estimation

Nonlinearities are assumed in cases where filtered data exist along the aggregate consumption function. Because the world consists of more than 200 countries, there will always be those countries, especially toward the bottom of the consumption function, where non-linear estimation is simply not possible. For these countries, equilibrium latent demand is assumed to be perfectly parametric and not a function of wealth (i.e., a country’s stock of income), but a function of current income (a country’s flow of income). In the long run, if a country has no current income, the latent demand for stem cell technological applications is assumed to approach zero. The assumption is that wealth stocks fall rapidly to zero if flow income falls to zero (i.e., countries which earn low levels of income will not use their savings, in the long run, to demand stem cell technological applications). In a graphical sense, for low-income countries, latent demand approaches zero in a parametric linear fashion with a zero-zero intercept. In this stage of the estimation procedure, low-income countries are assumed to have a latent demand proportional to their income, based on the country closest to it on the aggregate consumption function.

1.3.6 Step 6. Aggregation And Benchmarking

Based on the models described in Chapter 1, latent demand figures are estimated for all countries of the world, including for the smallest economies. These are then aggregated to get world totals and regional totals. To make the numbers more meaningful, regional and global demand averages are presented. Figures are rounded, so minor inconsistencies may exist across tables.

1.3.7 Step 7. Latent Demand Density: Allocating Across Cities

With the advent of a "borderless world", cities become a more important criteria in prioritizing markets, as opposed to regions, continents, or countries. This report also covers the world’s top 2,000 cities. The purpose is to understand the density of demand within a country and the extent to which a city might be used as a point of distribution within its region. From an economic perspective, however, a city does not represent a population within rigid geographical boundaries. To an economist or strategic planner, a city represents an area of dominant influence over markets in adjacent areas. This influence varies from one industry to another, but also from one period of time to another.

Similar to country-level data, the reader needs to realize that latent demand allocated to a city may or may not represent real sales. For many items, latent demand is clearly observable in sales, as in the case for food or housing items. Consider, again, the category "satellite launch vehicles." Clearly, there are no launch pads in most cities of the world. However, the core benefit of the vehicles (e.g. telecommunications, etc.) is "consumed" by residents or industries within the world's cities. Without certain cities, in other words, the world market for satellite launch vehicles would be lower for the world in general. One needs to allocate, therefore, a portion of the worldwide economic demand for launch vehicles to regions, countries, and cities. This report takes the broader definition and considers, therefore, a city as a part of the global market. I allocate latent demand across areas of dominant influence based on the relative economic importance of cities within its home country, within its region, and across the world total. Not all cities are estimated within each country as demand may be allocated to adjacent areas of influence. Since some cities have higher economic wealth than others within the same country, a city’s population is not generally used to allocate latent demand. Rather, the level of economic activity of the city is used vis-à-vis others.

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Hematopoietic Stem Cells VIII. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The Hematopoietic Stem Cells VIII. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

This volume stems from the eighth international symposium and workshop entitled "Hematopoietic Stem Cells VIII" held hosted by the University of Tuebingen, Germany in the fall of 2011. The meeting was designed to bring ∼30 leading scientists together to discuss the state–of–the–art in the field of hematopoietic stem cells. Topics reviewed in this volume include: differential requirements for Wnt and Notch signaling in hematopoietic versus thymic niches; hematopoietic stem cell expansion; TIM–3 as a therapeutic target for malignant stem cells in acute myelogenous leukemia; regulatory factors for hematopoietic stem cells; reprogramming factors; immune reconstitution and strategies for rebuilding of the immune system after haploidentical stem cell transplantation; zebrafish xenografts as a tool for in vivo studies on human cancer; enhancing engraftment of cord blood cells; current insights into neutrophil homeostasis; and molecular live cell bioimaging in stem cell research, among others.

NOTE: Annals volumes are available for sale as individual books or as a journal. For information on institutional journal subscriptions, please visit [external URL]

ACADEMY MEMBERS: Please contact the New York Academy of Sciences directly to place your order ([external URL] Members of the New York Academy of Science receive full–text access to the Annals online and discounts on print volumes. Please visit [external URL] for more information about becoming a member.

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Stem Cell Therapy Market by Type (Allogeneic, Autologous), Therapeutic Application (Musculoskeletal, Wound & Injury, CVD, Surgery, and aGVHD), Cell Source (Adipose tissue, Bone Marrow, Neural, Embryo/Cord Blood derived) – Global Forecasts to 2021 – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The Stem Cell Therapy Market by Type (Allogeneic, Autologous), Therapeutic Application (Musculoskeletal, Wound & Injury, CVD, Surgery, and aGVHD), Cell Source (Adipose tissue, Bone Marrow, Neural, Embryo/Cord Blood derived) – Global Forecasts to 2021 Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

Growth in the global stem cell therapy market is driven by factors such as the growing awareness of the therapeutic potency of stem cells in effective disease management, development of advanced genome-based cell analysis techniques, increasing public-private investments for development of stem cell therapies, identification of new stem cell lines, and developments in infrastructure related to stem cell banking and processing. In addition, countries such as Japan, South Korea, and China are offering new growth opportunities for players operating in this market. The North American region is expected to command the largest share in the stem cell therapy market in 2016.

Based on the type of therapy, the allogeneic stem cell therapy segment is estimated to command the larger share of the global stem cell therapy market in 2016. This growth can be attributed to the growing availability of allogeneic stem cell therapy products, wider therapeutic applications of allogeneic stem cells, easier production scale-up due to easy availability of sources of stem cells, and growing number of clinical trials of allogeneic stem cell therapies as compared to autologous stem cell therapies.

The stem cell therapy market is niche industry with a growing number of global and local companies involved in the development and commercialization of stem cell therapy products. Osiris Therapeutics, Inc. (U.S.), MEDIPOST Co., Ltd. (South Korea), Anterogen Co., Ltd. (South Korea), and Pharmicell Co., Ltd. (South Korea) were the leading players in the global stem cell therapy market in 2015. New product launches and approvals; expansions; and partnerships and agreements are the major strategies adopted by most of the market players to achieve growth in the stem cell therapy market during 2013-2016.

Research Coverage:

This report studies stem cell therapy market based on type of therapy (allogeneic and autologous). These stem cell therapies are used for the treatment of various diseases (including musculoskeletal disorders, wound healing, CVDs, and GI diseases, among others). The report also studies, the factors (such as drivers, restraints, opportunities, and challenges) which affect the market growth in a positive and negative manner. It analyzes opportunities and challenges in the market for stakeholders and provides details of the competitive landscape for market leaders. The report forecasts the revenue of the market segments with respect to four main regions, namely, North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the Rest of the World. The stem cell therapy market report strategically profiles the key players who are involved in the manufacturing and commercialization of stem cell therapy products and comprehensively analyze their market ranking and core competencies. The report tracks and analyzes competitive developments such as new product launches and enhancements; expansions; and partnerships and agreements in the stem cell therapy market.

Reasons to Buy the Report:

From an insight perspective, this research report focuses on various levels of analysis-market share analysis of the top players and company profiles, which together comprise and discuss basic views on the competitive landscape; emerging and high-growth segments of the stem cell therapy market; and high-growth regions and their respective drivers, restraints, challenges, and opportunities.

The report will enrich both established firms as well as new entrants/smaller firms to gauge the pulse of the market, which in turn will help firms in garnering a greater market share. Firms purchasing the report could use any one or a combination of the below-mentioned five strategies (market penetration, product development/innovation, market development, market diversification, and competitive assessment) for strengthening their market shares.

The report provides insights on the following pointers:

  • Market Penetration: Comprehensive information on products offered by the top 10 players in the stem cell therapy market. The report analyzes the stem cell therapy market by type, therapeutic application, cell source, and region.
  • Product Development/Innovation: Detailed insights on research and development activities, developmental product pipeline, and new product launches in the stem cell therapy market.
  • Market Development: Comprehensive information about the lucrative emerging markets. The report analyzes the markets for various stem cell therapy products across four geographies (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the Rest of the World).
  • Competitive Assessment: Assessment of market shares, strategies, products, distribution networks, and manufacturing capabilities of the leading players in the stem cell therapy market.

Read more and order at Stem Cell Therapy Market by Type (Allogeneic, Autologous), Therapeutic Application (Musculoskeletal, Wound & Injury, CVD, Surgery, and aGVHD), Cell Source (Adipose tissue, Bone Marrow, Neural, Embryo/Cord Blood derived) – Global Forecasts to 2021

Hematopoietic Stem Cells V, Volume 1044. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The Hematopoietic Stem Cells V, Volume 1044. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

The most recent developments in hematopoietic stem cell research are presented in this volume, along with their clinical implications. The field of hematopoietic stem cell biology is rapidly advancing, and new ideas and concepts supported by fascinating new technologies captivated the interest and excitement of the participants of the meeting.

The sharing of new ideas and technologies with other scientists represents an invaluable stimulus, particularly for the young investigators in the field. It is hoped that the spirit of the meeting will be carried forward to the readers of this volume and that its content will stimulate new and fruitful projects in the field of stem cell biology.

The major topics covered are genetic and epigenetic regulation of stem cells, stem cell plasticity, stem cell regulation and self–renewal, and embryonic stem cells as well as malignant stem cell biology.

NOTE: Annals volumes are available for sale as individual books or as a journal. For information on institutional journal subscriptions, please visit [external URL] />

ACADEMY MEMBERS: Please contact the New York Academy of Sciences directly to place your order ([external URL] Members of the New York Academy of Science receive full–text access to the Annals online and discounts on print volumes. Please visit [external URL] for more information about becoming a member.

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Cardiovascular Regeneration and Stem Cell Therapy – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The Cardiovascular Regeneration and Stem Cell Therapy Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

This book is the definitive reference on two of the most exciting areas of cardiovascular research myocardial regeneration and stem cell therapy for the treatment of disease. Edited by pioneers in the area, with contributions from every major investigator worldwide, it covers:

The biology of stem cells
The actions of stem cells from the bone marrow, the heart, and embryos on the normal restorative and repair functions of the heart and blood vessels
How stem cells could contribute to myocardial recovery in the face of injury and aging
How adjuvant therapy with growth factors might enhance stem cell activity in regeneration and repair
Clinical applications and clinical experiences

This fully referenced publication presents the current state of knowledge in both basic science and clinical practice, and is an essential reference for scientists, students, and clinicians.

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Stem Cell Bioprocessing. Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomedicine – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The Stem Cell Bioprocessing. Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomedicine Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

Stem cell bioprocessing describes the main large-scale bioprocessing strategies for both stem cell culture and purification, envisaging the application of these cells for regenerative medicine and drug screening. Bioreactor configurations are described, including their applications for stem cell expansion, and stem cell separation techniques such as isolation and purification are discussed. Basic definitions are provided concerning the different types of stem cells, from adult stem cells to the more recent induced pluripotent stem cells. The main characteristics of these different stem cell types are described, alongside the molecular mechanisms underlying their self-renewal and differentiation. The book also focuses on methodologies currently used for in vitro stem cell culture under static conditions, including the challenge of xeno-free culture conditions, as well as culture parameters that influence stem cell culture. Approaches for both stem cell culture and separation in micro-scale conditions are presented, including the use of cellular microarrays for high-throughput screening of the effect of both soluble and extracellular matrix molecules. A further section is dedicated to application of stem cells for regenerative medicine.

  • Maintains a unique focus on both the basic stem cell biology concepts, and their translation to large-scale bioprocessing approaches
  • Envisages the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and drug screening applications
  • Discusses the application of microscale techniques as a tool to perform basic stem cell biology studies

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The 2018-2023 World Outlook for Stem Cell Services – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The The 2018-2023 World Outlook for Stem Cell Services Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

This study covers the world outlook for stem cell services across more than 190 countries. For each year reported, estimates are given for the latent demand, or potential industry earnings (P.I.E.), for the country in question (in millions of U.S. dollars), the percent share the country is of the region, and of the globe. These comparative benchmarks allow the reader to quickly gauge a country vis-à-vis others. Using econometric models which project fundamental economic dynamics within each country and across countries, latent demand estimates are created. This report does not discuss the specific players in the market serving the latent demand, nor specific details at the product level. The study also does not consider short-term cyclicalities that might affect realized sales. The study, therefore, is strategic in nature, taking an aggregate and long-run view, irrespective of the players or products involved. This study does not report actual sales data (which are simply unavailable, in a comparable or consistent manner in virtually all of the countries of the world). This study gives, however, my estimates for the worldwide latent demand, or the P.I.E., for stem cell services. It also shows how the P.I.E. is divided across the world's regional and national markets. For each country, I also show my estimates of how the P.I.E. grows over time (positive or negative growth). In order to make these estimates, a multi-stage methodology was employed that is often taught in courses on international strategic planning at graduate schools of business.

1.3 The Methodology

In order to estimate the latent demand for stem cell services on a worldwide basis, I used a multi-stage approach. Before applying the approach, one needs a basic theory from which such estimates are created. In this case, I heavily rely on the use of certain basic economic assumptions. In particular, there is an assumption governing the shape and type of aggregate latent demand functions. Latent demand functions relate the income of a country, city, state, household, or individual to realized consumption. Latent demand (often realized as consumption when an industry is efficient), at any level of the value chain, takes place if an equilibrium is realized. For firms to serve a market, they must perceive a latent demand and be able to serve that demand at a minimal return. The single most important variable determining consumption, assuming latent demand exists, is income (or other financial resources at higher levels of the value chain). Other factors that can pivot or shape demand curves include external or exogenous shocks (i.e., business cycles), and or changes in utility for the product in question.

Ignoring, for the moment, exogenous shocks and variations in utility across countries, the aggregate relation between income and consumption has been a central theme in economics. The figure below concisely summarizes one aspect of problem. In the 1930s, John Meynard Keynes conjectured that as incomes rise, the average propensity to consume would fall. The average propensity to consume is the level of consumption divided by the level of income, or the slope of the line from the origin to the consumption function. He estimated this relationship empirically and found it to be true in the short-run (mostly based on cross-sectional data). The higher the income, the lower the average propensity to consume. This type of consumption function is shown as "B" in the figure below (note the rather flat slope of the curve). In the 1940s, another macroeconomist, Simon Kuznets, estimated long-run consumption functions which indicated that the marginal propensity to consume was rather constant (using time series data across countries). This type of consumption function is show as "B" in the figure below (note the higher slope and zero-zero intercept).

The average propensity to consume is constant. For a general overview of this subject area, see Principles of Macroeconomics by N. Gregory Mankiw, South-Western College Publishing; ISBN: 0030340594; 2nd edition (February 2002).

Is it declining or is it constant? A number of other economists, notably Franco Modigliani and Milton Friedman, in the 1950s (and Irving Fisher earlier), explained why the two functions were different using various assumptions on intertemporal budget constraints, savings, and wealth. The shorter the time horizon, the more consumption can depend on wealth (earned in previous years) and business cycles. In the long-run, however, the propensity to consume is more constant. Similarly, in the long-run, households, industries, or countries with no income eventually have no consumption (wealth is depleted). While the debate surrounding beliefs about how income and consumption are related and interesting, in this study a very particular school of thought is adopted. In particular, we are considering the latent demand for stem cell services across some 190 countries. The smallest have fewer than 10,000 inhabitants. I assume that all of these counties fall along a "long-run" aggregate consumption function. This long-run function applies despite some of these countries having wealth; current income dominates the latent demand for stem cell services. So, latent demand in the long-run has a zero intercept. However, I allow firms to have different propensities to consume (including being on consumption functions with differing slopes, which can account for differences in industrial organization, and end-user preferences).

Given this overriding philosophy, I will now describe the methodology used to create the latent demand estimates for stem cell services. Since this methodology applies to a large number of categories, the rather academic discussion below is general and can be applied to a wide variety of categories, not just stem cell services.

1.3.1 Step 1. Product Definition And Data Collection

Any study of latent demand across countries requires that some standard be established to define "efficiently served". Having implemented various alternatives and matched these with market outcomes, I have found that the optimal approach is to assume that certain key countries are more likely to be at or near efficiency than others. These countries are given greater weight than others in the estimation of latent demand compared to other countries for which no known data are available. Of the many alternatives, I have found the assumption that the world’s highest aggregate income and highest income-per-capita markets reflect the best standards for “efficiency”. High aggregate income alone is not sufficient (i.e., China has high aggregate income, but low income per capita and cannot be assumed to be efficient). Aggregate income can be operationalized in a number of ways, including gross domestic product (for industrial categories), or total disposable income (for household categories; population times average income per capita, or number of households times average household income per capita). Brunei, Nauru, Kuwait, and Lichtenstein are examples of countries with high income per capita, but not assumed to be efficient, given low aggregate level of income (or gross domestic product); these countries have, however, high incomes per capita but may not benefit from the efficiencies derived from economies of scale associated with large economies. Only countries with high income per capita and large aggregate income are assumed efficient. This greatly restricts the pool of countries to those in the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), like the United States, or the United Kingdom (which were earlier than other large OECD economies to liberalize their markets).

The selection of countries is further reduced by the fact that not all countries in the OECD report have industry revenues at the category level. Countries that typically have ample data at the aggregate level that meet the efficiency criteria include the United States, the United Kingdom, and in some cases France and Germany.
Is it declining or is it constant? A number of other economists, notably Franco Modigliani and Milton Friedman, in the 1950s (and Irving Fisher earlier), explained why the two functions were different using various assumptions on intertemporal budget constraints, savings, and wealth. The shorter the time horizon, the more consumption can depend on wealth (earned in previous years) and business cycles. In the long-run, however, the propensity to consume is more constant. Similarly, in the long-run, households, industries, or countries with no income eventually have no consumption (wealth is depleted). While the debate surrounding beliefs about how income and consumption are related and interesting, in this study a very particular school of thought is adopted. In particular, we are considering the latent demand for stem cell services across some 190 countries. The smallest have fewer than 10,000 inhabitants. I assume that all of these counties fall along a "long-run" aggregate consumption function. This long-run function applies despite some of these countries having wealth; current income dominates the latent demand for stem cell services. So, latent demand in the long-run has a zero intercept. However, I allow firms to have different propensities to consume (including being on consumption functions with differing slopes, which can account for differences in industrial organization, and end-user preferences).Given this overriding philosophy, I will now describe the methodology used to create the latent demand estimates for stem cell services. Since this methodology applies to a large number of categories, the rather academic discussion below is general and can be applied to a wide variety of categories, not just stem cell services.

1.3.1 Step 1. Product Definition And Data Collection
Any study of latent demand across countries requires that some standard be established to define "efficiently served". Having implemented various alternatives and matched these with market outcomes, I have found that the optimal approach is to assume that certain key countries are more likely to be at or near efficiency than others. These countries are given greater weight than others in the estimation of latent demand compared to other countries for which no known data are available. Of the many alternatives, I have found the assumption that the world’s highest aggregate income and highest income-per-capita markets reflect the best standards for “efficiency”. High aggregate income alone is not sufficient (i.e., China has high aggregate income, but low income per capita and cannot be assumed to be efficient). Aggregate income can be operationalized in a number of ways, including gross domestic product (for industrial categories), or total disposable income (for household categories; population times average income per capita, or number of households times average household income per capita). Brunei, Nauru, Kuwait, and Lichtenstein are examples of countries with high income per capita, but not assumed to be efficient, given low aggregate level of income (or gross domestic product); these countries have, however, high incomes per capita but may not benefit from the efficiencies derived from economies of scale associated with large economies. Only countries with high income per capita and large aggregate income are assumed efficient. This greatly restricts the pool of countries to those in the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), like the United States, or the United Kingdom (which were earlier than other large OECD economies to liberalize their markets).The selection of countries is further reduced by the fact that not all countries in the OECD report have industry revenues at the category level. Countries that typically have ample data at the aggregate level that meet the efficiency criteria include the United States, the United Kingdom, and in some cases France and Germany.Latent demand is therefore estimated using data collected for relatively efficient markets from independent data sources (e.g. Euromonitor, Mintel, Thomson Financial Services, the U.S. Industrial Outlook, the World Resources Institute, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, various agencies from the United Nations, industry trade associations, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank). Depending on original data sources used, the definition of "stem cell services" is established. In the case of this report, the data were reported at the aggregate level, with no further breakdown or definition. In other words, any potential services that might be incorporated within stem cell services fall under this category. Public sources rarely report data at the disaggregated level in order to protect private information from individual firms that might dominate a specific product-market. These sources will therefore aggregate across components of a category and report only the aggregate to the public. While private data are certainly available, this report only relies on public data at the aggregate level without reliance on the summation of various category components. In other words, this report does not aggregate a number of components to arrive at the "whole". Rather, it starts with the "whole", and estimates the whole for all countries and the world at large (without needing to know the specific parts that went into the whole in the first place).Given this caveat, in this report we define the sales of stem cell services as including all commonly understood services falling within this broad category, such as embryonic, fetal, adult, amniotic, cord blood, and induced pluripotent stem cell services, therapeutics, and treatments and stem cell banking, acquisition, testing, and cryopreservation, irrespective of product packaging, formulation, size, or form. Companies participating in this industry include Advanced Cell Technology, Cryo Cell Technologies, Athersys, Geron Corporation, TiGenix, and VetCell Biosciences. In addition to the sources indicated below, additional information available to the public via news and/or press releases published by players in the industry was considered in defining and calibrating this category. All figures are in a common currency (U.S. dollars, millions) and are not adjusted for inflation (i.e., they are current values). Exchange rates used to convert to U.S. dollars are averages for the year in question. Future exchange rates are assumed to be constant in the future at the current level (the average of the year of this publication’s release in 2017).This report was prepared from a variety of sources including excerpts from documents and official reports or databases published by the World Bank, the U.S. Department of Commerce, the U.S. State Department, various national agencies, the International Monetary Fund, the Central Intelligence Agency, various agencies from the United Nations (e.g. ILO, ITU, UNDP, etc.), and non-governmental sources and various public sources cited in the trade press.

1.3.2 Step 2. Filtering And Smoothing

Based on the aggregate view of stem cell services as defined above, data were then collected for as many similar countries as possible for that same definition, at the same level of the value chain. This generates a convenience sample of countries from which comparable figures are available. If the series in question do not reflect the same accounting period, then adjustments are made. In order to eliminate short-term effects of business cycles, the series are smoothed using a 2-year moving average weighting scheme (longer weighting schemes do not substantially change the results). If data are available for a country, but these reflect short-run aberrations due to exogenous shocks (such as would be the case of beef sales in a country stricken with foot and mouth disease), these observations were dropped or "filtered" from the analysis.

1.3.3 Step 3. Filling In Missing Values

In some cases, data are available for countries on a sporadic basis. In other cases, data from a country may be available for only one year. From a Bayesian perspective, these observations should be given the greatest weight in estimating missing years. Assuming that other factors are held constant, the missing years are extrapolated using changes and growth in aggregate national income. Based on the overriding philosophy of a long-run consumption function (defined earlier), countries which have missing data for any given year are estimated based on historical dynamics of aggregate income for that country.

1.3.4 Step 4. Varying Parameter, Non-Linear Estimation

Given the data available from the first three steps, the latent demand in additional countries is estimated using a "varying-parameter cross-sectionally pooled time series model".

The interested reader can find longer discussions of this type of modeling in Studies in Global Econometrics (Advanced Studies in Theoretical and Applied Econometrics V. 30), by Henri Theil, et al., Kluwer Academic Publishers; ISBN: 0792336607; (June 1996), and in Principles of Econometrics, by Henri Theil John Wiley & Sons; ISBN: 0471858455; (December 1971), and in Econometric Models and Economic Forecasts by Robert S. Pindyck, Daniel L. Rubinfeld McGraw Hill Text; ISBN: 0070500983; 3rd edition (December 1991). Simply stated, the effect of income on latent demand is assumed to be constant across countries unless there is empirical evidence to suggest that this effect varies (i.e., the slope of the income effect is not necessarily the same for all countries). This assumption applies across countries along the aggregate consumption function, but also over time (i.e., not all countries are perceived to have the same income growth prospects over time and this effect can vary from country to country as well). Another way of looking at this is to say that latent demand for stem cell services is more likely to be similar across countries that have similar characteristics in terms of economic development (i.e., African countries will have similar latent demand structures controlling for the income variation across the pool of African countries). This approach is useful across countries for which some notion of non-linearity exists in the aggregate cross-country consumption function. For some categories, however, the reader must realize that the numbers will reflect a country’s contribution to global latent demand and may never be realized in the form of local sales. For certain country-category combinations this will result in what at first glance will be odd results. For example, the latent demand for the category "space vehicles" will exist for Togo even though they have no space program. The assumption is that if the economies in these countries did not exist, the world aggregate for these categories would be lower. The share attributed to these countries is based on a proportion of their income (however small) being used to consume the category in question (i.e., perhaps via resellers).

1.3.5 Step 5. Fixed-Parameter Linear Estimation

Nonlinearities are assumed in cases where filtered data exist along the aggregate consumption function. Because the world consists of more than 200 countries, there will always be those countries, especially toward the bottom of the consumption function, where non-linear estimation is simply not possible. For these countries, equilibrium latent demand is assumed to be perfectly parametric and not a function of wealth (i.e., a country’s stock of income), but a function of current income (a country’s flow of income). In the long run, if a country has no current income, the latent demand for stem cell services is assumed to approach zero. The assumption is that wealth stocks fall rapidly to zero if flow income falls to zero (i.e., countries which earn low levels of income will not use their savings, in the long run, to demand stem cell services). In a graphical sense, for low-income countries, latent demand approaches zero in a parametric linear fashion with a zero-zero intercept. In this stage of the estimation procedure, low-income countries are assumed to have a latent demand proportional to their income, based on the country closest to it on the aggregate consumption function.

1.3.6 Step 6. Aggregation And Benchmarking

Based on the models described in Chapter 1, latent demand figures are estimated for all countries of the world, including for the smallest economies. These are then aggregated to get world totals and regional totals. To make the numbers more meaningful, regional and global demand averages are presented. Figures are rounded, so minor inconsistencies may exist across tables.

1.3.7 Step 7. Latent Demand Density: Allocating Across Cities

With the advent of a "borderless world", cities become a more important criteria in prioritizing markets, as opposed to regions, continents, or countries. This report also covers the world’s top 2,000 cities. The purpose is to understand the density of demand within a country and the extent to which a city might be used as a point of distribution within its region. From an economic perspective, however, a city does not represent a population within rigid geographical boundaries. To an economist or strategic planner, a city represents an area of dominant influence over markets in adjacent areas. This influence varies from one industry to another, but also from one period of time to another.

Similar to country-level data, the reader needs to realize that latent demand allocated to a city may or may not represent real sales. For many items, latent demand is clearly observable in sales, as in the case for food or housing items. Consider, again, the category "satellite launch vehicles." Clearly, there are no launch pads in most cities of the world. However, the core benefit of the vehicles (e.g. telecommunications, etc.) is "consumed" by residents or industries within the world's cities. Without certain cities, in other words, the world market for satellite launch vehicles would be lower for the world in general. One needs to allocate, therefore, a portion of the worldwide economic demand for launch vehicles to regions, countries, and cities. This report takes the broader definition and considers, therefore, a city as a part of the global market. I allocate latent demand across areas of dominant influence based on the relative economic importance of cities within its home country, within its region, and across the world total. Not all cities are estimated within each country as demand may be allocated to adjacent areas of influence. Since some cities have higher economic wealth than others within the same country, a city’s population is not generally used to allocate latent demand. Rather, the level of economic activity of the city is used vis-à-vis others.

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Hematopoietic Stem Cells VI, Volume 1106. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The Hematopoietic Stem Cells VI, Volume 1106. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

Stem cell research holds great promise for therapeutic applications. This rapidly advancing field is the focus of the biennial international symposium and workshop whose proceedings are contained within this volume.

The major topics covered are stem cell function, including self–renewal, survival, migration, and regulation; the stem cell niche; stem cell fate as lineage commitment takes place; malignant hematopoiesis; hematopoiesis regulators; and embryonic stem cells and plasticity.

As with previous volumes in this unique series of proceedings, it is hoped that further cooperation and collaborative projects will be generated by disseminating these presentations widely.

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ACADEMY MEMBERS: Please contact the New York Academy of Sciences directly to place your order ([external URL] Members of the New York Academy of Science receive full–text access to the Annals online and discounts on print volumes. Please visit [external URL] for more information about becoming a member.

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Stem Cells: A Cellular Fountain of Youth, Vol 8. Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology – Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Industries

The Stem Cells: A Cellular Fountain of Youth, Vol 8. Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology Report has been published. It provides updated in 2018 year analysis of industries from Biotechnology, Healthcare, Stem Cells Markets.

This volume provides a timely and thorough review of the current state of understanding of a fascinating type of cell that is capable of forming many or all cells in the body. In humans and other mammals embryonic stem cells, the immediate offspring of the fertilized egg, are capable of forming any type of cell in the body. Moreover stem cells are present in many different tissues in adults that are capable of dividing and differentiating into the specific cell types that comprise the organ in which they reside.

A major focus of the book is to provide the reader with up-to-date information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the proliferation, differentiation and survival of stem cells, and how aging and age-related disease impacts on stem cells. Leading authorities detail the properties and therapeutic potential of embryonic stem cells and stem cells of the nervous and immune systems, muscle and bone. Particularly exciting are emerging technologies for using stem cells to treat human age-related diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

This book will be a valuable reference for developmental biologists and for scientists and clinicians who study and treat a variety of diseases.

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